10 Fun Activities for Moms with Alzheimer’s

Elder Depot's List of Activities for Mother's Day for those with AlzheimersMother’s Day is about honoring and celebrating mothers.  When you have an elderly mother or grandmother with Dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease, Mother’s Day shouldn’t just be about purchasing and dropping off a gift; but rather creating lasting memories that you can remember and cherish with your mother.  Elder Depot wanted to share our list of simple, easy things that you can do to bring some happiness to your mother’s life on this special day and create a wonderful memory.  The good news is that most of these suggestions are free and only require sharing a little of your time!

Activities can vary depending on the stage of Alzheimer’s, so we tried to create a variety of common and simple things that you can both enjoy.  The most important thing to remember is that you will one day cherish and be thankful for all of the moments that you spent with your mother – taking the time to show you cared.

10 Things To Do on Mother’s Day

  1. Have lunch or dinner together.
    If mom is in a nursing or assisted living home and unable to leave, cook up a quick meal or pick up a pre-made meal and sit with her while eating so you can enjoy the moment together
  2. Celebrate as if it were her birthday.
    Put a single candle in a cupcake or piece of cake and sing her “Happy Mother’s Day”
  3. Take a walk or sit outside together.
    If the weather permits, bring your mom outside for a walk or just some fresh air and sunshine (Vitamin D) and bring up some old memories! If mom is in a facility and physically able, ask to borrow a wheelchair or transport chair to wheel her outside for a short time.
  4. Have an old fashioned beauty day.
    How about a nice pedicure! Paint mom’s nails or put some curls in her hair and show her how good she looks in the mirror!
  5. Look over some old photos.
    Conjure up some memories of familiar faces or times by showing an old photo album or memorable photos. Maybe even do a little Scrapbooking.
  6. Sing some old church hymns or familiar songs.
    If your singing skills are not up to the task, listen to some old familiar tunes together. Encourage mom to sing along and you might get a surprising response!
  7. Put together a simple puzzle.
    Puzzles with larger pieces are easier to see and handle and those with brighter colors may draw more interest.
  8. Bring the family dog for a visit.
    If your family dog is friendly and calm enough for mom to be comfortable around, bring the dog over for some one-on-one contact. If mom is in a facility that will not allow pets, see if you can take the dog to her in the lobby or bring your mom outside to spend some time with the dog – animals can be very therapeutic!
  9. Watch an old movie together.
    Pop in an old favorite movie, like the Sound of Music!
  10. Enjoy some gardening.
    If your mom used to enjoy gardening, let her sit outside with you and watch you do some of the gardening. If she is in a facility or this is not possible, bring in some flowers from your garden and cut the stems and organize the vase with your mom and she’ll have a beautiful home-made bouquet.

We hope this list provides you with some useful suggestions to make your Mother’s Day special. The most important thing to remember is to spend some quality time with your mother on Mother’s Day. Its not about the best gifts, but about the memories you will have for years to come.

From all of us at Elder Depot, we wish you and your family a very Happy Mother’s Day!

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Independent Living vs. Assisted Living.
Which is right for my loved one?

As our parents or elderly loved ones age, they have numerous options when looking for the perfect place to spend their golden years. Of course, many remain in their homes. Some are looking for an easier way of life, free from the daily chores that homeownership requires, while others seek out the company of people their own age, with opportunities for socializing and daily activities. Still others require assistance with daily living, such as managing medications, dressing and bathing.

If your loved one can still do everything for themselves and would like to live among peers and enjoy scheduled activities, independent living communities – also called retirement living – are an excellent option. They offer a safe, secure and social environment for active, independent seniors.

Seniors in independent housing may live in an apartment, a small home, or a cottage. These communities usually have on-site staff members that provide a small amount of supervision and offer a “maintenance-free” living option, often providing housekeeping, laundry and dining services.

Independent living is perfect for people who:
• Want to maintain their independence.
• Want to rid themselves of the burden of cooking, cleaning and maintaining a home.
• Want more social interaction than living at home.
• Like the security of being around other people and getting some supervision from the staff.

If your loved one is still able to move about freely and is seeking a certain amount of independence, but needs help with some daily activities such as bathing, preparing meals, taking medication, or dressing themselves, an assisted living community may make sense. Residents of an assisted living community live in their own apartment and are able to come and go as they please, while receiving assistance as needed. They can dine with others in a dining room or make their own meals. Quality senior care living communities offer a variety of daily activities to choose from. At an assisted living community, your loved one will still have independence while getting the care and services they need to lead a fulfilling life.

An assisted living facility may also be able to help if your loved one still has certain cognitive abilities, but is beginning to show signs of dementia that could result in isolation, frustration, or forgetting critical tasks such as taking medication. Communities that have “memory care neighborhoods” have caregivers who receive specialized training in memory care along with added security measures to manage residents’ safety. Memory care programs can also include brain fitness exercises, memory-building practices, and specialized therapy for residents living with dementia. If a resident begins to show signs of greater physical needs, the staff will begin to talk to the family about making the transition to a skilled nursing community.

In general, assisted living communities:
• Can provide direct assistance with everyday tasks, like bathing, dressing and meals.
• Have trained staff available and monitoring 24 hours a day.
• Help residents maintain their dignity while aging.
• May have specialized units for residents with Alzheimer’s or dementia.
• Can help with transportation to doctor appointments.
• Often have busy activity calendars to keep residents engaged with other residents.

If you want to ensure your loved one can stay in the same community as their needs change, look into a Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC). CCRCs allow people to remain in the same familiar and comforting environment even if their care needs change. If you’re looking for one community that you can call home even as your health changes, consider a CCRC.

About the Author:
David has over 20 years’ experience as a writer and editor. Senior issues have long been his passion, and in addition to past experience writing about maintaining a healthy outlook throughout every phase of life, he has volunteered his time and skills to such organizations as Senior Services of King County in Seattle. He is one of the many expert authors who is currently writing on behalf of Emeritus assisted living communities.

Safety Products for Home Care to Prevent Injuries

I have been deeply involved with the elder care market in the past few years. After my grandmother fell down and broke her hip, we began looking at some very helpful products and ways to prevent these serious falls. During this time, I also began helping out at the local Family Bridges home care office in Cincinnati, Ohio so this made me become aware of the issues that our senior citizens have. Below are some of the much needed products that I think elders should have when living at home.

Roll Around Walker– There are many different types of walkers, but if your elder has a lot of trouble moving around the house, these make things much easier because they have 4 wheels. Plus it has a basket which my grandmother regularly uses to store items such as her purse and cordless phone in case she need to contact someone conveniently.
Uplifting Seats– This is something that we haven’t needed yet for our elder, but every few months she seems to be having a little more trouble than before. Currently we are looking at giving her either a chair or seat type lift. They can be helpful to prevent falls from the struggle they have with getting of the couch.
Cushioned Bath Mats– We have been recommending non-slip type bath mats for a while, but these really caught my eye. Not only do these prevent slip & falls from happening, they also are padded so that if an elder does fall, the mat will absorb most of the impact.
• Rails & Gripping Handles- Elder Depot carries a few types of safety handles such as this handhold suction grip. These are great anywhere. A quick tip: be sure to observe where in the house the elder is showing any sign of struggle. Places to look for are areas with steps, bathrooms, and doorways.

Those are just some of the items that I think will be helpful to prevent serious accidents. Investing in a few of these items is worth preventing injuries that I have seen cost family 10’s of thousands of dollars. Plus you have the pain associated with that.

There are many other helpful items and it depends on the person’s needs so feel free leave a comment below to recommend a suggestion that you think should be added.